Monday, September 11, 2017

September 11, 2017

On the 16th anniversary of the September 11th tragedy, it is important to remember that the country will always rebuild, recover and become an even stronger nation -- whatever challenges we may face.





Photos by Cynthia Dial\

#neverforget

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Top Five Secrets to Savvy Travel


Excerpted from Condé Nast Traveler

Time it Right

1. Fly on a Tuesday, Wednesday or Saturday.
Traveling on off-peak days – and at off-peak times – means lower fares, a less crowded cabin and a greater chance of snagging those elusive mileage-award seats. Taking two days off for a long weekend?  Instead of a Thursday to Sunday or a Friday to Monday trip, save money by flying on a Saturday and returning on a Tuesday.
Photo by Cynthia Dial


2. Hop Between Cities at Midday.
When you’re traveling through Europe or Asia and need to get from one city to another, consider scheduling transportation for the middle of the day.  If you leave at dawn, you miss the sunrise – ideal for photography and observing locals – and reach your destination at midday, when temperatures are highest, the light is at its worst for photos and it’s too early to check into your hotel.  (You may also have to fight rush-hour commuters and miss a breakfast that is included in your rate.)

3. Visit Islands During Shoulder Season.
Peak-season rates on islands often reflect nearby countries’ vacation schedules rather than the best time to visit (Bali’s hotels, for instance, fill up with Japanese in early May and with Australians in January).  In low season, many businesses shut down.  Shoulder season – when crowds are thinner but the weather is still good – is the solution.

Find the Hidden Deals

4. Sign Up for E-mail Notifications.
The best airfare and hotel sales are largely unannounced.  Airlines and hotel companies target specific subsets of travelers – loyalty program members, holders of certain credit cards, people who’ve registered on their Web sites – and alert them by e-mail.  To keep your in-box from being bombarded, get a dedicated e-mail address for such alerts and check it when you’re ready to start planning your next trip.  If you can make quick purchasing decisions, sign up for alerts from flash-sale sites that sell hotel rooms at discounts of 40 percent or more, such as Jetsetter and Tablet Hotels.

Find the Right Human Beings

5. Get the Best Room for Your Dollar
At luxury properties, rates vary substantially according to occupancy. A room could be $350 one week because there’s a big group and $250 the next because nobody’s coming.  For top-end hotels that have on-site reservation desks, call and ask the manager when, during your travel window, the hotel will be emptiest and thus have the lowest rates.  Then ask something like, “If I come on that date, would there be a chance of an upgrade to ocean-view?”

#travel #travelingcynthia #traveltips #travelsecrets



Monday, August 21, 2017

Travel Quote of the Day

Travel quote: "It is no coincidence that in no known language does the phrase 'As pretty as an Airport' appear." Douglas Adams
#travel #travelquotes #travelingcynthia

Thursday, August 10, 2017

8 Ways to Breeze Through Customs Quickly


From AllianzTravelInsurance.com

The basics are simple: Fill out your paperwork before you get off the plane, book a seat that'll let you get out of your plane quickly and then head straight for the customs agent without bathroom detours.

To some degree, customs lines are inevitable. After all, every time a plane full of people arrives, it takes a little while to process all that luggage. You'll also have to go through customs if you're traveling across international borders. Still, that doesn't mean you have to suffer; there's a lot you can do to get yourself toward the front of the line and speed your way through the actual customs encounter.

1. Travel Light

Guess what: The less time you spend juggling your bags, the faster you can get through the customs line. With that said, there's one item you should never be without: a pen for filling out your customs form on the plane. Somehow there are never enough pens to go around.

Do you see someone struggling to manage all their bags on the way through security? As hard as it can be to watch them having a hard time, you should never transport someone else's bag through customs. You never know what they might be carrying that they'd like to escape responsibility for. If you just can't stand to watch the mayhem, offer to rent them a luggage cart – but rest assured that your Good Samaritan obligations end there.

2. Ditch the Food

Many restrictions exist for transporting fresh products like fruit, vegetables or meat across international lines; your trip through customs will usually go faster if you ditch the food entirely. Still, even if the food you have is legal, failing to declare it can net you some hefty fines. Therefore, honesty is always the best policy.

3. Track Your Spending

Each country allows you to transport a certain dollar amount of purchases across the border without paying "duty" – basically, a tax levied on purchases made or gifts received while you're abroad. Keep your receipts, or track how much you've spent at the very least. This way, you can prove whether you fall under the duty limit or how much you may be over the limit.

4. Avoid Farms

Customs won't deny you re-entry to the country if you've visited a farm, but you may lose some time in customs while they clean your footwear to make sure you're not accidentally bringing any biological contaminants into the country. However, customs people don't clean your boots for the fun of it. Invasive species and illnesses like foot and mouth disease are very real hazards. If you have visited any farms, admit it and accept the possible delay.

5. Put Your Phone Away

Want to have an up-close-and-personal visit with a customs agent? Just whip out a camera and start taking pictures; it'll get their attention quickly. If you'd rather have a quick and hassle-free experience, leave your phone and cameras tucked away until you're all the way through customs.

6. Apply for Global Entry

If you want to make everyone else in the customs line turn green with envy, consider applying for the Global Entry program. You'll have to pay $100 and give your fingerprints, and not every airport supports the Global Entry program. Nevertheless, if you're accepted into the program and traveling through a major airport, your trip through customs boils down to a quick stop at an automated kiosk to confirm your identity and make any necessary declarations. The NEXUS and SENTRI programs, also offered by the Department of Homeland Security, offer similar benefits.

7. Check Your Baggage Requirements with Your Airline

If your flight into the United States doesn't take you directly to your final destination, then you might have to retrieve your checked bags after passing through immigration and before going through customs. After that, you'll need to recheck the bags again before you catch your connecting flight. Check with your airline beforehand to find out whether you'll have to retrieve and recheck your bags or not.

8. Know Where You're Staying

Be prepared to tell officials where you're staying in the country you're visiting. They may ask you to provide the address of your hotel, so keep a copy of your reservation on hand. Sometimes they also ask you for proof of your departure ticket and date, so those copies need to stay in your carry-on bag as well.

Some travelers take being first in the customs line very seriously. It's true that if there's a long walk to customs, moving quickly can get you out ahead of the pack. Still, there's no need to turn a trip through customs into a race or a competition. No matter where you end up in line, we guarantee that the experience will be more pleasant if you relax and enjoy the experience. 
#travel #traveltips #travelingcynthia #easycustoms 



Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Eight Expert Travel Hacking Tips for 2017

By Brian Robson

“Travel hacking” is when you work within the rules of airlines, hotels, and travel credit cards to earn rewards such as points and miles to put toward free travel. Despite its name, travel hacking is simple (and legal), and lots of people do it every day to save money and see the world. If you have ever wanted to take the family on a trip and just couldn’t afford the airfare, learning to travel hack can solve your dilemma.
Photo by Cynthia Dial

Meet the experts

We reached out to the following travel rewards experts for their advice on choosing a travel card, maximizing rewards, and making the most of points or miles at redemption. Here’s what they told us.

Tip #1 – Take advantage of more than just free travel.

You might not know this, but travel credit cards are good for more than just earning points. Some of these cards grant you and your family access to additional perks. Ariana from TopCashback explains:
Airline miles or hotel loyalty points may seem like the only rewards, but think again! In addition to miles, some reward programs (such as American Express) give you access to airport lounges, restaurant and hotel concierges and deals on rental cars.”

Rewards programs may also offer opportunities for earning extra points with participating car rental services, hotels, and airlines. All the more reason to make sure you read up on everything your card has to offer.

Tip #2 – Choose cards with miles bonus incentives and flexible redemption.

Travel hacking is all about finding ways to earn miles and points faster while working within the existing rules. Cat Holladay from The Compass is Calling explains how some cards make that even easier:

“The key is to sign up for the cards with the most miles’ bonus incentive AND the most flexible usage. Several cards out there give 50-60,000 ‘miles’ after spending $3,000-4,000 in the first 3 months. 60,000 miles is the equivalent of 2 domestic tickets on many airlines, almost two international tickets on Singapore Airlines, and one international ticket on most carriers.”

Choosing a travel credit card with flexible redemption means more options when it’s time to redeem your hard-earned miles. Some top travel cards offer 1:1 rewards transfer to airline and hotel loyalty programs or discounts on travel booked through the card’s rewards program, and more. Others allow you to redeem miles for a travel statement credit, which means you can reimburse yourself for eligible travel purchases, no matter where you book. And, as Cat points out, many of them offer generous mile bonuses for spending a couple thousand dollars within the first few months.

Tip #3 – Maximize rewards on everyday purchases.

What kind of purchases do you make in your everyday life? Do you find yourself eating out more often than not? Are you brand loyal? It is wise to sign up for a credit card with a rewards program that aligns with those everyday spending habits.

“By signing up for a new credit card with a hefty welcome bonus and just doing your normal, everyday spending, you can accrue points or miles towards free flights (plus taxes or fees, generally low) or hotel rooms,” explains David Slotnick of The City Miler.

One of the best things about a credit card that rewards your everyday spending habits is that you don’t have to change anything. You don’t need to adjust how much you’re willing to pay for something just to hit a particular threshold, and you’ll earn your way toward a free trip in no time.

Tip #4 – Don’t opt for cash back.

Some cards let you cash in your points for a pre-paid gift card. While that might seem like a perk, it’s a colossal waste of points and miles. With most travel cards, you’ll get the best points redemption value for, you guessed it, travel. (Some travel credit cards even give you a nice redemption bonus if you book through their cardmember portal!)

“It’s tempting to exchange your points for cash back – you see the dollar amount beckoning to you on your screen, just one click away,” says Kaja Olcott of RewardExpert. “However, people need to know that it’s not necessarily the best value available to them. In fact, redeeming for air travel typically offers the most lucrative return.”

Tip #5 – Study loyalty program terms for extra points.

Travel isn’t the only category where loyalty programs exist to help you earn and spend points. In fact, quite a few travel credit cards on the market feature loyalty programs in other categories for dining, car rentals and more. Studying and understanding the terms of these programs is a great way to maximize your point accrual, according to Torsten Jacobi of Mighty Travels:

“Loyalty programs often offer bonus miles or points just for signing up to them for free. If you shop online, you can use various portals like MileagePlus Shopping and AAdvantage eShopping to earn as you spend and some loyalty programs also have dining programs so you can earn as you eat. You can earn with your car rentals, your mobile phone provider, when you buy an Internet service, order flowers and sometimes even when you buy or sell a property!”

Another way to earn extra points is with loyalty programs that let you “level up” in terms of spending and earning points. “Just for signing up you get 3 American Airlines points for every dollar you spend at participating restaurants,” explains Sean Ogle from Location Rebel. “Once you hit 12 transactions in a year, you get bumped up 5 points per $1 spent. So to give you an example, if you go out to a dinner and spend $100, you’ll get 500 AAdvantage points just for being part of the program. If you register one of your rewards credit cards, then you’ll also get points from them.”

Tip #6 – Consider a card with an annual fee.

No one likes to pay annual fees on their travel credit cards. However, in some cases, the annual fee is worth it, as Matthew Kepnes of Nomadic Matt points out:

“For those who travel a lot and fly a lot, I think it is worth it to get a card with a fee. Fee-based cards tend to give you a better rewards scheme, where you can accumulate points faster, get better access to services and special offers, and get better travel protection. With these cards, I have saved more money on travel than I have spent on fees.”

The cost of the annual fee can pay for itself several times over. This is especially true with cards that come with a generous sign-up bonus. For instance, if you opt for a card that nets you 60,000 points just for signing up, the cash back on those points could pay for the card for several years. It’s also worth noting that some of these cards offer to waive the annual fee for your first year.

Tip #7 – Be flexible.

Generally, flexibility is a good thing to have when life throws little curve balls at you. This is especially true for booking travel and redeeming hotel rewards. Some rewards programs help you save money or earn extra points if you are flexible about your departure date and are willing to shift things around. You might even be eligible for more rewards if you downgrade your hotel accommodations.

“Flexibility is key when trying to maximize airline and hotel rewards. Sometimes the award space will appear just days before your trip. If your travel dates aren’t flexible, book a backup itinerary and change it as better options become available.” – Scott Mackenzie, Travel Codex.

It’s often important to opt for travel credit cards that have flexible spending and redemption bonuses. The same is true for how flexible you are in redeeming those points.

Tip #8 – Transfer points to partner programs.

Sometimes it pays to transfer your points to a partner program. Take it from the Financial Panther himself, Kevin. He explains:

“Some card issuers have a bunch of travel partners to which you can transfer your points over and get tremendous deals. For example, I have a friend this year, who is flying to Hawaii round trip from Minneapolis for 25,000 points! He did this by transferring his points to Korean air partner, who partners with Delta, and they have a deal where you can fly anywhere in the US roundtrip for 25k points.”

Some top travel credit cards feature 1:1 points transfer to several airline and hotel loyalty programs. That means you won’t lose any points if you decide to do like Kevin’s friend and transfer those points for a better deal.

These are just a few expert travel hacking tips you can use to earn free travel while making the most of your points. So don’t let the rising cost of travel stop you or your family from seeing the world. Take some tips from our panel of travel experts, and start making the system work for you.

#travel #travelingcynthia #traveltips #travelhacking


Thursday, July 6, 2017

Is Wanderlust Genetic?

Nomadic Matt wonders (and I agree with his assessment): Is there also personality type for travelers?
Photo by Cynthia Dial

Personally, I think people who break the mold and dream of faraway do have a certain personality type. They are mentally wired for it - both genetically and psychologically. I think we are risk takers who are little different from the rest. We want adventure, change, and excitement in our lives. That’s not to say other people don’t want travel too but we crave it like junkies.
There are those who are content with going on that one trip a year or two and then there are those that secretly have Google flights open at work every day.
Remember how in the 3rd Matrix movie "The Architect" (the guy at the center of the Matrix) told Neo that not everyone accepted the Matrix? There were always people who resisted the programming, thus the Matrix robots in the Matrix created Zion (and the never-ending war)?
Well, we’re like those people.

The typical path society wants us to walk down doesn’t jive with our wanderlust or our desire to keep pushing the boundaries of who we are and what we know about the world. 
#travel #traveltips #travelingcynthia #wanderlust #travelgene

Friday, May 19, 2017

Travia: King Tut

Travia: King Tut is the nickname for Tutankhamen, an Egyptian leader who ruled from age 9 to 18. He was buried with 145 underpants.
#travel #traveltips #travia #travelingcynthia #kingtut